STUDENT GUIDE TO ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURES

Disability Support and Accommodations at the Corcoran College of Art and Design

 STUDENT GUIDE TO ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURES

Corcoran College of Art and Design has a policy of providing reasonable accommodations to qualified students with a disability according to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act to ensure that there will be no discrimination on the basis of disability. Accommodations are adjustments made for students with disabilities in order to allow them to access the same education experiences as their peers. The purpose of an accommodation is to all equal access to the curriculum.  

1. The student with a disability who requires accommodations must register with the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs. The student must complete and submit the Disability Support Services Intake Form which can be found on the Learning Specialist website http://www.corcoran.edu/disability-support-services-and-accommodations

or email AKleinman@corcoran.org to request the form be sent as an attachment. It is the student's responsibility to initiate the request for services.Students are encouraged to establish documentation at least two weeks prior to the first day of the semester.

2. Students with a disability are responsible for providing documentation from the appropriate medical or psychological personnel and should make an intake appointment with the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs.

a. Release of Information forms to obtain documentation is available from the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs. Students are responsible for any charges incurred while obtaining documentation.

b. Policies for required documentation vary according to the disability. The documentation must clearly identify the disability and provide sufficient information regarding the limitations of the disability in order to permit Corcoran College of Art and Design to make a determination as to whether the requested accommodations are appropriate. Corcoran College of Art and Design will be responsible to determine, based upon the evaluative data, what those accommodations should be.

c. Documentation of disability should be mailed or faxed by the professional to the attention of the Learning Specialist in the Office of Student Affairs at Corcoran College of Art and Design.  500 17thStreet NW Washington, DC 20010.  Fax Number is 202-639-1802. The documentation may also be hand delivered by the student in a sealed company envelope with the professional’s signature across the seal.

3. Accommodations will be determined based upon the documentation of the disability. It is important to have the documentation state how the disability affects academic performance. Students who believe that they would like additional accommodations must make the request in writing to the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs. These will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

4. After accommodations have been established by the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs a letter will be presented to the student describing the accommodations for which he/she qualifies to receive for each class the student is enrolled that semester. A confidential letter will also be presented to the instructor describing the accommodations for which the student qualifies in that class.

5. Students who are experiencing unresolved problems receiving appropriate accommodations should contact the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs as soon as possible.  

6. Students must request new letters of accommodations at the beginning of every semester.

 

Significant Differences between High School and College Disability Services

High School

College/University

Applicable Laws

I.D.E.A.

A.D.A.

Section 504

Section 504

Rehabilitation Act

Rehabilitation Act

Required Documentation

I.E.P. (Individual Education Plan) and 504 Plan

Varies depending on the disability, I.E.P and 504 are not sufficient, must include the testing on which the accommodations are based

School provides evaluation at no cost to student

Student must get evaluation at own expense

School conducts evaluations at prescribed intervals

Student generally not required to be re-tested after initial documentation approved

Student Role

Student is identified and supported by parents/teachers

Student must self-identify to the Learning Specialist

Primary responsibility for accommodations belongs to the school

Primary responsibility for accommodation requests belongs to the student

Parental Role

Parents have access to student records and participate in the accommodation process

Parents do not have access to disability-related records unless student provides written consent

Parents advocate for students

Students advocate for self

Teachers/Professors

May modify curriculum and/or alter pace of assignments

Not required to modify curriculum

Use multi-sensory approach

Tend to rely on lecture; may or may not use multi-sensory approach

Weekly testing, mid-term, final, and graded assignments

Testing and assignment frequency vary

Attendance taken and reported

Attendance often not taken; student is responsible for attending class

Grades

Grades may be modified based on curriculum

Grades reflect the quality of work submitted

 

DOCUMENTATION OF DISABILITY & ELIGIBILITY

Appropriate documentation is required by a written report prepared by an appropriately licensed professional that clearly diagnoses a disability and/or records showing the history of the disability. Medical doctors, psychiatrists, psychologists, and school psychologists are among the professionals who routinely evaluate, diagnose, and treat disabilities. This list is not intended to be exhaustive or to restrict assessment in other pertinent areas. The following guidelines are provided to assure that evaluation reports are appropriate to document eligibility:

•Hearing and speech disabilities. Qualified personnel may include ear, nose, and throat specialist, audiologist, speech therapist, psychologist, family physician, or other qualified medical specialist.

•Learning Disability and Attention Deficit Disorder. Qualified personnel may include licensed psychologist, psychiatrist, family physician, or other qualified licensed personnel.

•Mental or Psychological Disabilities. Qualified personnel include psychologist, psychiatrist, licensed counselor, family physician, or other mental health professional.

•Mobility, Coordination, Traumatic Brain Injury, HIV and AIDS, and Physical Health Disabilities. Qualified personnel may include family physician, orthopedist, neurologist, cardiologist, rehabilitation specialist, or other medical professionals. Medical records must clearly document, diagnose, and discuss the condition.

•Visual Disabilities. Qualified personnel may include ophthalmologist, optometrist, family physician, or other medical specialist.

 

ADDITIONAL EVALUATION CRITERIA

• Evaluations must be current, generally within the past three years. Under certain circumstances the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs may request an updated or more extensive evaluation.

• The written report must include a specific diagnosis, clear and specific evidence and identification of a disability. For example, terms such as “learning styles”, “learning problems ”,  and “academic difficulties” do not constitute a learning disability.

• Diagnostic reports must include the names and titles of the diagnostician, the test utilized in diagnosing as well as the date(s) of testing. Reports must be typed and otherwise legible.

• New students are encouraged to establish documentation two weeks prior to the first class period.

 

If you have any questions, please email AKleinman@corcoran.org or call Amanda Kleinman, Learning Specialist in Student Affairs at 202-639-1895.

Examples of Reasonable Accommodations for

Corcoran College of Art and Design

Students with Disabilities

The following is intended to give students and faculty an expectation of the types of reasonable accommodations that Corcoran College of Art and Design provides for students with disabilities. The reasonable academic accommodation(s) and service(s) provided to any student are determined on an individual basis based upon each student’s situation. The following lists are intended to provide students and faculty with a general idea of what Corcoran College of Art and Design has to offer. Students with disabilities may receive one, all, or any combination of accommodations that are reasonable. The lists of accommodations are in no way all inclusive or exhaustive.

 

Acquired Brain Injuries

Academic accommodations that may be reasonable for students with an Acquired Brain Injury may include:

• Note-taking support

• Additional time on work done in class and on tests

• Alternative test location which provides a quiet environment that reduces distractions.

• Specified exam or assignment schedule for the course.

• Allowance of assistive devices such as a tape recorder for class notes or lap top computer to be used in the classroom.

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Academic accommodations that may be reasonable for students with ADD or ADHD may include:

• Note-taking support.

• Additional time on work done in class and on tests

• Alternative test location which provides a quiet environment that reduces distractions.

• Priority seating to allow the student to sit in a section of the classroom which minimizes distractions.

• Allowance of assistive devices such as a tape recorder for class notes to be used in the classroom.

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Possible accommodations that may be reasonable for a student with Autism Spectrum Disorders may include:

  • Provide quiet areas for learning and test taking
  • Allow more time for work assignments
  • Provide a note taker or instructor’s notes
  • Provide step by step directions
  • Allow use of a computer for in-class work
  • Allow for sensory or comfort items
  • Allow for adjustments to seating placement
  • Flexibility with class participation

 

 

Chronic Illness

• Note-taking support

 

• Additional time for work done in-class, project completion, and on tests

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• Note-taking support

 

• Priority seating to allow the student to sit in a section of the classroom which minimizes distractions.

 

• Sign language interpreter providing services for classes, academic meetings, and other academic events.

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Learning Disabilities

• Note-taking support. Students may approach another student in the course to take copy their notes or work with their instructor(s) to have this service coordinated anonymously.

 

• Additional time for work done in-class, project completion, and on tests

 

• Alternative test location which provides a quiet environment that reduces distractions.

 

• Test readers or scribe

 

• Priority seating to allow the student to sit in a section of the classroom which minimizes distractions.

 

• Allowance of assistive devices such as a tape recorder, spell checker, laptop computers, or non-programmable calculators to be used in the classroom for accessing lecture material or for use on assignments and/or exams.

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Mobility Impairment

  • Additional time for work done in-class, project completion, and on tests

 

• Allowance of assistive devices such as a tape recorder, laptop, etc. for class notes to be used in the classroom.

• Access to campus elevators

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

  • Please notethere is NO parking available at the Downtown Campus

 

Psychological Disorders

• Note-taking support

 

  • Additional time for work done in-class, project completion, and on tests

 

• Alternative test location which provides a quiet environment that reduces distractions.

 

• Notifications to the instructor(s) in the Letter of Accommodations regarding the specific challenges the psychological disorder may pose on the student.

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

• Allowance for extended absences due to hospitalization.

 

Visual Impairment

• Note-taking support

 

  • Additional time for work done in-class, project completion, and on tests

 

• Test reader or scribe.

 

• Allowance of assistive devices such as a tape recorder for class notes to be used in the classroom.

 

• Notifications to the instructor(s) in the Letter of Accommodations regarding the specific challenges the visual impairment may pose on the student.

 

• Other reasonable accommodations as determined on an individual basis.

 

Temporary Disabling Conditions (i.e., broken limbs)

Corcoran College of Art and Design students with temporary disabling conditions may be eligible to receive temporary assistance through the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs. Students should submit sufficient documentation regarding their condition. Each student’s situation will be evaluated on an individual basis. For more information, please call the Learning Specialist in Student Affairs.